Friday, January 1, 2010

Even the Ardent Viper Has a Soft Side…

Yesterday I hinted that The Hamburg Post would have a guest blogger today and here she is; enjoy.


 

Don't tell anyone….but the author of the Hamburg Post is actually a real softie.   
 

I've know Chris since the fall semester of 1992 when I decided that I wanted to be a part of the Hall Orientation Team at the University of North Dakota.  The leader of that team?  Chris.  The rest is history.  I promised Chris that I wouldn't post any pre-receding hair line photos.  And by receding hairline, I mean his—not mine.
 

In the last year that Chris and I have reconnected via the ever popular Facebook, we have many common interests—one of which is blogging.
 

As you know, Chris blogs about politics, big government, and the like.  I am completely the opposite.  My blog is a random bunch of nothing.  Seriously.  If you want to see it, come by and check it out—you can read about how I may end up on the TV show Mall Cops, how I almost burned down the future in-laws kitchen or even my e-mail from actor Wil Wheaton.  You can read it here:  http://osmundson.blogspot.com


 

Good stuff, I tell ya'.   
 

But the reason for my post today is that I have a second blog.  I have a blog that I use to promote a non-profit project that I started where I send cards to people who are fighting cancer. 


 

See?  Chris does have a soft side, doesn't he?


 

How the project started is a long story, but the short version is this:  I have a friend who is now a breast cancer survivor and because of cards sent in the mail from friends and family, her days were made a little brighter.  When she received a card in the mail, her day went a little easier and she was brought out of some of her darkest days.

 

And that is how Cards by Amy's Angels was born. 
www.cardsbyamysangels.com


 

I, along with a small group of ladies, make cards (read:  handmade—no Hallmark cards here!), write a personal note in the card, and send it to the cancer patient.  We will send cards directly to the cancer patient or to the person requesting the card.  Privacy is important to us, so we delete all e-mails after the card has been sent, and make sure that the person receiving the card knows how we got their name.


 

Since our project started in November 2008, we have sent out over 200 cards.

 
 

However, our project, sadly, has hit a lull.


 

We get a majority of our card requests through an organization that we partner with—but we are having second thoughts about working with them.  There is nothing wrong with this group, but we are starting to feel that their focus has been taking on a new direction that we aren't so keen on supporting. 


 

We need to continue to get the word out.  This is why Chris has asked me to write a post today.


 

We are looking for ways to expand our site.  Do you know a way that we can get the word out?  We'd love to hear your ideas—just leave a comment and we'll read what you have to say.


 

Here's to a great 2010!